Blog Index Brown Hyena Research Project Update.

JJ's movement.

JJ's movement.

JJ-1251 movement Nov-Dec 2014.

JJ-1251 movement Nov-Dec 2014.

Last movement of 1251.

Last movement of 1251.

Stomach contents of 1251.

Stomach contents of 1251.

So 2015 has not started well for the Brown Hyena Project. We have lost two hyena in the first two weeks.

Data from hyena 1251’s collar ( a male from the north) showed that he was venturing further north. We investigated the data from the remaining collared hyena and it seemed that JJ (the male from the south) was venturing northwards into 1251’s territory.

1251 moved out of the northern section and into the Bayete/Rippons conservancy area, probably to avoid JJ (see attached maps). It is here that we believe he must have had an encounter with another resident hyena, which lead to a fight.

During this fight he was badly injured and took a nasty bite to his back left leg. This bite was so powerful it actually broke the lower bone completely. This meant that he was unable to forage efficiently, which explained all the anthropogenic items we found in his stomach. He died of starvation due to the injury he sustained, directly impacting his ability to find food.

The second hyena to die was in fact the first one we collared in this project. She was named during the facebook poll and we named her Nomathemba, meaning “journey”. We lost her signal and didn’t receive data from her collar for a couple of weeks. We can confidently say that she’s been killed by farmers in the area and that the collar has possibly been destroyed.

Rogue hyenas are often blamed for killing lambs and injuring cows on their farms. In South Africa, land used for domestic livestock farming and game ranching accounts for an estimated 68.6% (839 281 km2) of total land area. In these areas, human–wildlife conflict (including human– carnivore conflict) is so frequent that legislation regulating lethal control of ‘damage causing’ species is currently in preparation. Game reserves and conservation areas often encourage the presence of predators due to both their recognised contribution to ecosystems and contribution to tourism. However, this has led to an increase in conflict between conservation areas and farmers.

We are busy analysing the full data sets from both collars and will keep everybody updated with any findings.

We are just going to have to catch more in 2015 to help us get the data we need. Onward and upward!



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